Asthma alert in Rotorua

 

 

 

 

 

 

A new report has found The report found Rotorua has the country’s second highest rate of child 

hospitalisation with asthma with a rate of 1043 children aged under 15 admitted per 100,000 - a 52 percent higher level than the national average of 688 per 100,000.

A leading expert from Otago University Professor Jim Reid (pictured) has said urgent action is needed to address increasing rate of child hospitalisation due to asthma throughout Rotorua.

He makes these comments following the release of a new report from Massey University into the disease which shows child hospitalisations have increased 45% since 2002.

The report found Rotorua has the country’s second highest rate of child hospitalisation with asthma with a rate of 1043 children aged under 15 admitted per 100,000 - a 52 percent higher level than the national average of 688 per 100,000.

He says Kiwis are too “casual” about asthma which can have fatal outcomes (more than one Kiwi dies every week from the disease). Most asthma fatalities can be prevented by having the symptoms under control and using the Asthma Control Test to ensure the disease is being adequately managed.

He makes the comments ahead of ahead of winter (as the cold weather and related viruses will cause many asthmatics to be hospitalised.

Professor Jim Reid says:

  • One in five Maori and Pacific Island children have been diagnosed with asthma.

  • This compares to 15% of children and 11% of adults with the disease in the NZ population.

  • Hospitalisation rates are 3.7 times higher among those living in poverty

  • Around 70 people died from asthma last year alone and we need to get this preventable disease under control

  • The rates of hospitalisation and mortality from the disease are also higher among Maori/PI.

  • If left untreated asthma can also cause permanent scarring on the lungs

  • A simple test can help assess whether patients have their asthma under control

 

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